equine clicker training

using precision and positive reinforcement to teach horses and people

Tag Archive for ‘hoof care’

What can I train? H is for …

What can you do with clicker training? Sometimes we are limited by traditional thinking or just need some new ideas. In this A to Z series, I’ll be sharing ideas for things to train. I’ve trained some, but not all of them, and will share links to resources for more information whenever possible. I hope this list inspires you and you can’t wait to go out and teach some new […]

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Hoof handling: 12 Tips for success (Part 6)

This is the last blog in a six part series on teaching your horse to cooperate and participate in hoof handling. Tip 11: Building duration on hoof stands plus some troubleshooting tips I use my hoof stand for all four positions: front feet sole up in cradle, front feet extended on post, hind feet flexed (sole up) in cradle, and hind feet flexed forward sole down on stand. When I […]

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Hoof handling: 12 Tips for success (Part 5)

This is the fifth blog in a six part series on teaching your horse to cooperate and participate in hoof handling. Tip 9:  Prepare and train for farrier visits If you hire someone else to trim or shoe your horse, you’ll need to teach your horse the behaviors he needs for your farrier. In most cases, these will be variations on the behaviors you have already trained, but you will […]

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Hoof handling: 12 Tips for success (Part 4)

This is the fourth blog in a six part series on teaching your horse to cooperate and participate in hoof handling. Tip 7: Take breaks This is the simplest tip, but probably one of the most important because I find it’s easy to become too goal oriented when working on hoof handling. There is often a sense of urgency, especially if the horse’s feet are in need of attention. But […]

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Hoof handling: 12 Tips for success (Part 1)

Being able to safely handle and take care of our horse’s feet is an essential part of good horsemanship. But it’s not always easy. Horses usually have a natural reluctance to allow their feet to be handled and restrained and can show their anxiety by moving around or kicking out. Or, the horse may have learned the opposite approach, which is to pretend he is made of concrete and keep […]

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