equine clicker training

using precision and positive reinforcement to teach horses and people

Tag Archive for ‘Clicker Training’

What can I train? Z is for …

What can you do with clicker training? Sometimes we are limited by traditional thinking or just need some new ideas. In this A to Z series, I’ll be sharing ideas for things to train. I’ve trained some, but not all of them, and will share links to resources for more information whenever possible. I hope this list inspires you and you can’t wait to go out and teach some new […]

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What can I train? Y is for …

What can you do with clicker training? Sometimes we are limited by traditional thinking or just need some new ideas. In this A to Z series, I’ll be sharing ideas for things to train. I’ve trained some, but not all of them, and will share links to resources for more information whenever possible. I hope this list inspires you and you can’t wait to go out and teach some new […]

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What can I train? X is for …

What can you do with clicker training? Sometimes we are limited by traditional thinking or just need some new ideas. In this A to Z series, I’ll be sharing ideas for things to train. I’ve trained some, but not all of them, and will share links to resources for more information whenever possible. I hope this list inspires you and you can’t wait to go out and teach some new […]

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Getting Started with Riding: Common Questions

This article is an updated version of one that was originally published on my website (www.equineclickertraining.com) in 2015. I am combining both websites and have decided to share some of the more frequently read articles as blog posts so they are more accessible. This is the second of a two part series on using clicker training for riding. The first article is Getting started with riding: handling and delivering food. […]

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Happy First Anniversary to the Book!

On July 29, 2018, I clicked on the “publish” button for my book, Teaching Horses with Positive Reinforcement. Then I went and hid under the bed. Well, not really – although I might have been tempted to do the adult equivalent. While I was relieved to be done, I was not sure how the book would be received. That was a year ago. Since then, the book has been selling […]

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The Book – Thoughts on Chapter One: What is Clicker Training?

Clicker training changed my life. Usually, when I say that to people, they are surprised. They can understand how clicker training might have changed the way I train horses, but my life? That seems a little dramatic. But, it’s true. Once I started to understand why behavior happens and how I can influence it, my whole view of the world changed. Not only did I start to see connections and […]

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Teaching Horses with Positive Reinforcement: The Book…

In January 2016, I had an idea for a “little project.” I thought I would take some of the most useful articles from my website, blog, and Facebook page, organize them into a logical format and publish them as a set of “collected articles.” I organized the material into four volumes (beginner, advanced beginner, intermediate, and ridden work) and got to work. But, I quickly realized that just doing the first one […]

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Do You Have a Cue for That?

Last week I posted a video on my facebook page of Aurora learning the difference between targeting and manipulating an object, and it reminded me of something that I’ve been meaning to write about for a while. This is the importance of making sure that each new behavior has its own cue, that the cue is regularly practiced, and that old behaviors don’t lose their cues when new behaviors are […]

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Timing

One of the advantages of clicker training is that the use of a marker signal (the click) allows the trainer to tell the animal exactly what behavior she is reinforcing. When we observe an animal, it is tempting to think of behavior as discrete units, but a more accurate description of behavior would be what Dr. Susan Friedman calls a “stream of behavior,” where behavior is constantly changing and each […]

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